A CCAJN SURVEY OF RECENT REAL ESTATE SALES RECORDS REVEALS A WIDESPREAD ERROR RATE IN THE DESIGNATION OF NOISE AND ACCIDENT POTENTIAL ZONE INFORMATION PROVIDED TO HOME BUYERS


\ An extensive survey of Virginia Beach residential real estate marketing and sales records
covering nearly 13 consecutive months in 2001-2002 and 660 properties
was conducted by Citizens Concerned About Jet Noise (CCAJN).


Whether intentional, through a lack of training, carelessness or incompetence this failure on the part of real estate agents to adequately advise purchasers of expected noise and accident risk impacts grossly violates City ordinance. CCAJN presumes, of course, that the existing ordinance intends for the disclosure to be accurate.

Such appalling misrepresentation of the residential noise and aircraft accident risk environment refutes frequent claims by City officials and the real estate industry that homeowners are accurately advised of these impacts prior to purchasing a home. The study findings clearly indicate this assertion is not the case. Specifically, in a sample of 24 subdivisions, all completely within the 65 dB or greater noise zones, a disturbing 41% of marketed properties had inaccurate noise or accident risk designations (or both) to the benefit of the seller and agent. In a subset of homes in 8 subdivisions falling within Accident Potential Zones (APZs), commonly known as crash zones, 27% of the disclosures were in error, again to the benefit of the seller and agent.

It is evident that Navy officials should exercise prudence in perfunctorily relying in good faith on the claims of City officials and real estate interests who claim that everyone living in noise zones and APZs were fully aware of what noise and accident risk environment impacted their property prior to its purchase. Indeed, this study indicates that it would be irresponsible for the Navy to do so.


CCAJN calls upon the City of Virginia Beach, the Real Estate Information Network (REIN) and the Greater Hampton Roads Realtors Association (GHHRA) to investigate and correct this rampant inaccurate disclosure. REIN is also called upon to update its system software to prevent inaccurate disclosures.

REIN forms should also include more detailed information in its required disclosure documentation. The narrative description of the potential impacts and consequences of living within areas considered marginally and provisionally compatible, as well as incompatible, for residential use because of high to severe noise levels should be included. Relevant to this disclosure should be the admonitions contained in Navy, HUD, VA, and EPA documents - as well as the City ordinance - regarding the consequences of living in noise impacted residential areas.

For anyone interested in the Study Methodology  and a list of the subdivisions surveyed  Click Here